Suspension of Disbelief

Posts Tagged ‘anti-discrimination ordinance

Divided we fall

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Outrage Magazine | 18 June 2016

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Faces-of-LGBT

We love to say that the LGBT community revels in diversity – after all, our multi-colored rainbow flag is supposed to highlight that even if there are many of us who may come from different walks of life, we are still united in our struggle for the same cause (i.e. seeking equal rights for all).

Suffice it to say, I have seen the various faces that constitute the LGBT community in the Philippines.

I have met some who claim to represent (and – perhaps reflective of the elevating of the rich in a largely elitist heterosexual society – with actual pride at that) the “coño/conyo/konyo LGBT”, the elite who fail to see their privilege.

I have met some of the “karaniwan (common)”, whose main concern is to ensure day-to-day survival.

And I have met some of the “bekinals (a play with “beking kanal” or gays from the gutters; a term that may be politically incorrect, but is still used by many when referring to themselves to highlight their lowly status), those who are at the fringes of society; and whose very existence is marked by the hardships encountered not only by being LGBT, but also by their social status.

I’d have to say that, unfortunately, these segregations do not at all “blend”. That is, at least as far as my experience in the Philippines is showing, there’s no “waving of the same banner/flag” for the LGBT community.

We are too… broken; too divided.

And this could spell our fall.

Hear so many of the “coño/conyo/konyo LGBT” speak supposedly on behalf of the “entire LGBT community” while only focusing on such issues as marriage equality and passing the anti-discrimination bill in Congress (they do this in between parties or photoshoots or the likes). The mainstream media gives them the platform; and their allies in the ruling class (from politicians to celebrities) only “consult” with them on just about every LGBT-related issue (before publicly claiming they already spoke with the entire LGBT community). But they remain mum on other day-to-day issues, e.g. the policies being developed in Muslim areas in Mindanao that also affect LGBT people there, the effect among LGBT pensioners of the veto for SSS pension hike, and the failure of the Department of Health and PhilHealth to deal with the disparity of services offered in treatment hubs. Here, there seems to be more concern with faux publicity stunts that supposedly banned the expression of LGBT love, than actually finding practical solutions to deal with those who perpetuate the ills that affect us.

And then hear many of the karaniwan and bekinal LGBT people, whose stance is – because they are often ignored anyway – to just keep to themselves.

We call our divisions “diversity”, as if by doing so the cracks from within are covered up and are therefore made more appealing. In reality, there is nothing empowering about this often unspoken great divide.

We have to bridge the divide.

Because there is always room for everyone on the table.

Start getting immersed in different contexts. Ask the karaniwan and bekinal LGBT people to speak about their issues (in Congress/Senate, in the media). Stop only talking about the glamorous and start including issues of those who are unable to speak.

Because only if everyone is represented will our community be truly united.

And only then will we be truly a “community of diversity”.

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(Established in April 2007, Outrage Magazine remains the only publication exclusive for the lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer, questioning, intersex, asexual and allied community in the Philippines.)

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Did PNoy leave LGBT Pinoys in a ditch?

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Outrage Magazine | 29 July 2015

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LGBT organizations join the protest against President Noynoy Aquino, who has not once mentioned the plight of LGBT people in his SONA

LGBT organizations join the protest against President Noynoy Aquino, who has not once mentioned the plight of LGBT people in his SONA

Where are LGBT people in President Benigno “Noynoy” Aquino III’s so-called “daang matuwid” (straight/righteous path)?

As Aquino nears the end of his term, people are now asking if he has fulfilled his promises to the oft-mentioned “bosses”, the people. But – although since his election Aquino has focused on such issues as the economic growth by cutting the government spending, peace in Mindanao by talking (only) with the Moro Islamic Liberation Front (MILF), and the anti-corruption campaign that saw the arrests (though still sans the needed trials) of the likes of former President Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo, and Senators Juan Ponce Enrile, Jinggoy Estrada and Ramon Revilla Jr. – the issue of LGBT rights was never part of his priorities.

Looking back, Aquino’s addresses to the nation (via the annual State of the Nation Address, or SONA) contained parts that gave hope to minorities – the LGBT community included – whose lives continue to be dire solely because they are minorities.

In Aquino’s his first SONA in 2010, he said that “kaakibat ng ating mga karapatan at kalayaan ay ang tungkulin natin sa kapwa at sa bayan (together with our rights and freedom is our responsibility to our fellowmen and to our country/nation).” In 2012, “kung may inaagrabyado’t ninanakawan ng karaptan, siya ang kakampihan ko. Kung may abusadong mapang-api, siya ang lalabanan ko. Kung may makita akong mali sa sistema, tungkulin kong itama ito (if there is someone disadvantaged and whose rights are stolen, I will side with him. If there are abusers, I will fight them. If I see errors in the system, it is my duty to correct these).” And then last year, “gabi-gabi po, bago ako matulog, thank you at nakalamapas pa ako ng isang araw. Kung, sabi nga noong bata kami, ‘finish or not finish, pass your paper’, eh dumating na sa akin, palagay ko naman naramdaman na ninyo kung anong pagbabagong karapatan ng bawat Pilipinong mangyari. At bahala na kayong ituloy ito (every night, before I go to sleep, I say thanks for surviving another day. When – as it was said when we were kids, ‘finished or not finished, pass your paper’, it already reached me, and I think you already felt the changes to the rights that happened for every Filipinos. It’s now up to you to continue these).

But in actuality, five years hence, none of these changes are LGBT-specific.

This is why, according to Murphy Red, chairperson of Kapederasyon LGBT Sectoral Organization, they are under no illusion that Aquino will do anything anymore for the LGBT Filipinos.

Hindi na kami umaasa, hindi na kami nagiilusyon na magbibigay siya ng tulong sa huling taon niya (sa mga LGBTs). Sana lang sa huling pagkakataon, sa huling taon ng kanyang paninilbihan ay mamulat siya sa katotohanan na may LGBT sa lipunan na pinagsisibilhan niya at sa sa bayan na tinuturing niyang boss (We no longer hope, we are not under any illusion that he will give help in his remaining year to LGBT people. We hope that in the last stretch, in the last year of his office, he will finally see that there are LGBT people among the Filipino people he keeps saying as his bosses),” Murphy Red said.

Aquino’s neglect of the LGBT people may be seen in the non-mention of the need for the passage of an anti-discrimination law, with an anti-discrimination bill languishing in Congress for over 15 years now. If passed, such a law will protect the human rights of LGBT Filipinos by enforcing fines and even jail times to anyone who discriminates against LGBT people.

But, as Murphy Red said, “hindi priority ng rehimen na ito ‘yung pagpapasa ng Anti-Discrimination Bill o yung paghahain ng Anti-Hate Crime Law o Bill, para mapangalagaan sana ‘yung karapatan ng mga LGBT, at yung seguridad ng mga LGBT (this regime has not prioritized the passage of an anti-discrimination bill or an anti-hate crime law that could ensure the protection of LGBT people, and the security of LGBT people).”

Already, the lack of anti-hate laws has “nagresulta na sa sunod-sunod na pagpatay ng LGBTs (this already resulted in the numerous deaths of LGBT people),” said Murphy Red, who cited as an example transgender woman Jennifer Laude, who was brutally killed last year, with the primary suspect a US Marine. 

There are already anti-discrimination ordinances in some local government units (LGUs) in the country, including in Angeles, Bacolod, Cavite, Cebu, Davao, and Quezon City. But even here, there are still reported cases of discrimination, showing that LGU-wide ordinances are not enough to ensure the protection of the rights of LGBT people.

Ang ibang mga marginalized sectors ay kahit papaano may mga institution sa pamahalaan na nag-ca-cater sa kanilang mga interest, tulad ng iba-ibang programa ng mga LGUs o ngDSWD na tumutulong sa mga pangangailangan ng ibang minorities. Pero sa mga LGBT, wala talagang institution na nasa gobyerno na mangangalaga. Kung mayroon man, kami pa ang namimilit (Other marginalized sectors at least have institutions in the government that cater to them and their interests, such as in LGUs and the Department of Social Welfare and Development. But for LGBT people, no government body looks after our interests. And even if they end up serving us, it’s because they are forced to do so),” Murphy Red said.

In this year’s SONA, Aquino’s motherhood statements abound, such as when he said that “kaya gaya sa lahat ng iba pang suliranin, pagkakaisa po ang tanging susi para mapangalagaan ang ating karapatan (like when dealing with all problems, unity is the key to look after our rights).” But while many LGBT people dared join his sloganeering for “daang matuwid“, thereby joining in his fight, Aquino’s administration didn’t show any concrete efforts for the LGBT community in the last five years.

Wala talaga siyang nagawa. Nakalimang SONA na siya pero ni minsan hindi niya binanggit and mga LGBT. Wala sa agenda niya ang kalagayan ng LGBT (He hasn’t done a thing for LGBT people. He already had five SONAs but he did not even mention LGBT people once. The plight of LGBT people is not in his agenda),” Murphy Red said. “Zero ang marka ni PNoy sa buong termino niya (He gets zero mark for his entire term).”

Aquino’s 2015 SONA lasted more than two hours – one of the longest delivered by any President. And as he concluded his speech, some militant lawmakers, staged their protest inside the plenary hall by showing placards that read, among others, “Human Rights Violator”, “Serbisyo Palpak”, and “Pork Barrel King”.

As if Aquino couldn’t do any wrong, those who did not agree with him were booed.

And now the countdown begins for the last months of Aquino’s presidency.

For some LGBT groups like Kapederasyon, there is no longer hope for the current administration to take notice of the struggles of the LGBT people. But as is routine, every six years, they can’t help but hope that the next president will finally give LGBT people the attention.

Sa mga tatakbo sa 2016, para masiguro nila na makukuha nila ang boto ng mga LGBT, kailangan may malinaw silang agendang ilalatag para sa kagalingan ng mga LGBT. At ‘yun lang talaga ang hihilingin namin sa mga susunod na kandidato (To those who will run for office in 2016, for them to get the votes of LGBT people, they should have clear agenda to better the lives of LGBT people. That’s the only wish we have for these next candidates),” Murphy Red ended.

Transgender woman Claire laments how her life as a working LGBT person has worsened – not only did she experience discriminatory practices in her workplace because of her sexual orientation and gender identity and expression, but she also continues to face difficulties because of the pervasive contractualization of workers that empower private companies like her former employer to illegally dismiss her before she can be regularized. For Claire, it’s “layer after layer of difficulties that continued under the presidency of Noynoy Aquino,” she said in Filipino. PHOTO BY AARON BONETTE

Transgender woman Claire laments how her life as a working LGBT person has worsened – not only did she experience discriminatory practices in her workplace because of her sexual orientation and gender identity and expression, but she also continues to face difficulties because of the pervasive contractualization of workers that empower private companies like her former employer to illegally dismiss her before she can be regularized. For Claire, it’s “layer after layer of difficulties that continued under the presidency of Noynoy Aquino,” she said in Filipino.
PHOTO BY AARON BONETTE

Rainbow-rising

At SONA 2015, local LGBT organizations highlighted how much remains to be done to better the plight of LGBT people in the Philippines, such as the urgent passage of the Anti-Discrimination Law that has been languishing in Congress for over 15 years. PHOTO BY AARON BONETTE

At SONA 2015, local LGBT organizations highlighted how much remains to be done to better the plight of LGBT people in the Philippines, such as the urgent passage of the Anti-Discrimination Law that has been languishing in Congress for over 15 years.
PHOTO BY AARON BONETTE

Pink-struggle

Various LGBT organizations also joined those who expressed their discontent with the administration of Pres. Benigno Aquino III, particularly since – almost six years after taking office – the plight of LGBT people has not progressed, with, among others, the lack of an anti-discrimination law. PHOTO BY AARON BONETTE

Various LGBT organizations also joined those who expressed their discontent with the administration of Pres. Benigno Aquino III, particularly since – almost six years after taking office – the plight of LGBT people has not progressed, with, among others, the lack of an anti-discrimination law.
PHOTO BY AARON BONETTE

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(Outrage Magazine remains the only publication for the lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) community in the Philippines.)

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Envisioning Quezon City as gay capital just like San Francisco

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VERA Files and Yahoo Philippines | 27 November 2013

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Quezon City as the gay capital just like San Francisco and Amsterdam?QC-LGBT-summit-2

Why not, if what Quezon City Vice Mayor Joy Belmonte wants would be achieved.

“We want Quezon City to champion when it comes to practicing the rights of the LGBTs,” Belmonte said during a summit for the LGBTs organized by the Quezon City government in partnership with the University of the Philippines’ Center for Women’s Studies.

The summit was to promote awareness and strengthen the rights of the LGBTs in Quezon City. LGBT stand for Lesbians, Gays, Bi-sexual, Transgender.

“The primary objective of the summit is to gather the concerns of LGBTs from different teams and representations from different districts which will be submitted to the office of the Vice Mayor of Quezon City. They will study and use the data to amend the Anti-Discrimination Ordinance,” BJ Eco, project coordinator of Quezon City LGBT Summit said.

It was on September 16, 2003 when the Anti-Discrimination Ordinance (Q.C., Ordinance No. 1309) was passed in Quezon City, authored by Councilors Janet Malaya, Restituto Malangen, Ramon Medalla, Eric Medina, Jorge Banal, Diorella De Leon, and Jesus Suntay.

The city ordinance prohibits all acts of discrimination directed against homosexuals in any office in matters of hiring, treatment, promotion or dismissal in any office in Quezon City.

But for many LGBTs in Quezon City, they consider the Anti-Discrimination Ordinance as lackluster and too generic. It didn’t address other concerns of the LGBT community in Quezon City.

QC-LGBT-summit3“Although there’s already an Anti-Discrimination Ordinance in Q.C., we feel like that there should be a detailed provisions on what the ordinance covers. The ordinance was simple and it didn’t touch on some issues the LGBTs in Quezon City are facing,”Eco added.

Belmonte suggested that the ideal way to make amendments in the current city ordinance is to get first hand experiences from the people who have actually experienced being discriminated against.

“We wanted to gather different representatives of LGBTs in Quezon City and ask them to give us recommendations on how we should amend the Anti-Discrimination Ordinance so it will be more comprehensive,”she explained.

Last November 16, the Q.C. government invited LGBT organizations and individuals as well as some heterosexuals who support LGBTs, most of them from Quezon City, in a meeting to highlight the pressing matters of the LGBTs.

There were 300 participants; 240 of them invited by the office of the vice mayor through barangay networks. The remaining 60 were from LGBT and ally Quezon organizations which are either Quezon City-based or have made deals and partnership with the local government.

The summit highlighted areas where gender discrimination is rampant: family, community, religion, education,employment, legal, media, and health. QC-LGBT-summit

Specific instances of bullying and discrimination in school, in the workplace and in church were shared. One participant reported that Catholic churches in Quezon City discourages LGBTs to attend mass or volunteer in their activities. “The church should not discriminate anyone who wants to serve God,” he said.

They also asked that they should be entitled to free condoms and contraceptives.

The participants were also asked to give their recommendations on how the city ordinance should be amended. “We will forward all the data that we have gathered to the office of the Vice Mayor,” Eco said, “It’s really nice to know that the Quezon City government shows their concern to the LGBT community, especially with events like this, LGBTs will really feel that they are not alone.”

The summit also received some critical comments from other LGBT organizations, saying that the event was too limiting and it only focuses on the concerns of the LGBTs in Quezon City.

In can work both ways. You can consider this summit as limiting, but we can consider this as a trailblazing move that the Quezon City government is doing for the LGBT community. And we’re hoping that other local municipalities mirror what we’re doing,” Eco said.

“We wouldn’t be surprised if one day Quezon City will be like San Francisco or Amsterdam where LGBTs are properly respected and their rights are guaranteed,” Eco added.

The LGBT summit also aims to inspire other local governments to hold the same awareness events in their respective cities. Other major cities in the Philippines have also passed their own versions of Anti-Discrimination Ordinances are Bacolod City, Davao City, and Cebu City.

 

 

(VERA Files is put out by veteran journalists taking a deeper look at current issues. Vera is Latin for “true.”)

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