Suspension of Disbelief

Posts Tagged ‘Discrimination

Sen. Sonny Angara expresses hope it’ll be a ‘great Pride month’ for LGBT Filipinos

leave a comment »

Outrage Magazine | 9 June 2017

***

Sen. Sonny Angara – in a short clip dedicated to the LGBT community in the Philippines – extended his felicitations for the Pride month, just as he expressed hope it’ll be a ‘great Pride month’ for LGBT Filipinos.

Angara is – by and large – known as an LGBT ally, sponsoring one of the earlier versions of the Anti-Discrimination Bill (ADB), Senate Bill 948 (or the Comprehensive Anti-Discrimination Act).

SB 948 – which eyed to prohibit discrimination based on age, race, ethnicity, religion, sex, SOGI, HIV status, relationship status, disability, language, physical features, health status and medical history – failed to pass. Under the proposed measure, acts of discrimination include promoting and encouraging stigma, inciting hatred or violence, inflicting harm on health and well-being, and engaging in profiling. Also to be penalized are denial of political, civil and cultural rights; right to education, work, organize, expression; and denial of access to goods and services. Had it become law, offenders may be penalized with not less than a year but not more than six years imprisonment or a fine of not more than P500,000, or both.

In 2016, while guesting on a noontime show in TV giant ABS-CBN, Angara promoted SB 948, which was then pending in the Senate. He was quoted as saying that “any form of discrimination threatens order and stability in our country. It is imperative that discrimination — or any act that establishes, promotes and perpetuates standing inequalities and disregards the right to equality of treatment — be reduced.”

Angara, who has yet to verbalize his position on marriage equality, nonetheless stated that “I believe… LGBT unions should have equal rights under the law, including rights to inherit and other property rights.

.

(Established in April 2007, Outrage Magazine remains the only publication exclusive for the lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer, questioning, intersex, asexual and allied community in the Philippines.)

***

Use ‘she’ for Jennifer Laude

leave a comment »

VERA Files and Yahoo Philippines | 15 October 2014

***

 

Jennifer Laude1

Reporting on the brutal murder of a 26-year-old transpinay (pinay transgender) Jennifer Laude by a United States Marine, Private First Class Joseph Scott Pemberton, Saturday, one question in the minds of members of media aside from the details about the crime was what pronoun to use for Jennifer.

Naomi Fontanos, executive director of Gender and Development Advocates (GANDA) Filipinas, said, “When referring to a transgender woman, like Jennifer Laude; who was assigned male at birth, but identified herself as a woman — the appropriate pronoun to use is ‘she’.”

GANDA Filipinas is a non-profit, nonpartisan, non-government organization advocating genuine gender equality for all Filipinos. It also upholds the view that transgender rights are human rights. Most of its members consist of transgender women in the Philippines.

When writing about lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ), there is a need to understand the difference between “sex” and “gender.”

“Sex” is the term used to refer biological and physiological characteristics of a person while “gender” refers to the socially constructed roles and behaviors of a person. Gender does not necessarily have to match one’s sexual orientation.

The term “transgender” is commonly used as an umbrella term for those people whose gender identity and/or expression don’t fit their assigned sex at birth.

Another confusion that most people have when identifying someone whose gender identity and sexual orientation don’t match is the term “transsexual”.

“Transsexual” is a term referring to a person who does not identify with the sex that was assigned at birth and desires to realign their gender and sex through medical intervention.

“In the Philippines, there is poor understanding of these terms in spite of the uptake in their usage. Many Filipinos have the wrong notion that a transgender or a transsexual person [needs to] have some form of surgery. This is not correct,” Fontanos said.

The use of pronouns when identifying transgender and transsexual people should also follow their gender identity and/or expression.

In the case of Jennifer Laude, traditional media as well as those in social media, call her “Jeffrey, her birth name and use the pronoun “he.” This is politically incorrect.

In the same manner, calling a transgender or a transsexual person  “gay”, “lesbian”, “bayot”, “bakla”, or beki” is considered demeaning in LGBTQ community.

“Media practitioners should have the responsibility to educate themselves about sexual and gender diversity. If media people persist in telling stories involving the LGBTQ Filipinos, then it is their duty to tell those stories in a dignified way which means respecting their sexual orientation and gender identity. In Jennifer’s case, [the] media should respect the life she lived. Obviously, she lived her life as a woman and that’s the way we should remember her,” Fontanos said.

.

.

(VERA Files is put out by veteran journalists taking a deeper look at current issues. Vera is Latin for “true.”

***

Problems abound in implementation of PWD benefits

leave a comment »

VERA Files and Yahoo Philippines | 06 September 2014

***

LGBT community remembers those who died of HIV

LGBT community remembers those who died of AIDS

“Denver” (not his real name) is HIV-positive. He has been an outpatient at one of the HIV/AIDS treatment hubs in Manila for seven years already. And he just learned recently that he can avail some benefits and privileges from the government.

“I cannot blame them for not orienting us, the patients, that we can apply for a PWD ID, because they’re attending to a lot of patients already. We just hope that our government improves the dissemination of important information to the public,” Denver said.

Problems like that of Denver have been encountered by sick people whose disabilities are not physically obvious. It’s not just inadequacy in information dissemination but more on the issue of what is “chronic illness.”

Republic Act 7277, the Magna Carta for Disabled Persons defines Disabled Persons as those “suffering from restriction or different abilities as a result of a mental, physical, or sensory impairment, to perform an activity in the manner or within the range considered normal for a human being.”

R.A. 7277 was amended by Republic Act 9422 granting additional privileges and incentive to Persons with Disabilities (PWD).

It states that “Identification Cards shall be issued to any bonafide PWD with permanent disabilities due to any one or more of the following conditions: psychosocial, chronic illness, learning, mental, visual, and orthopedic, speech and hearing conditions.”

Chronic means a condition or disease that is persistent or otherwise long-lasting in its effects. HIV is one example of chronic illness which also includes asthma, diabetes, cancer lupus, and many more.

Problems arose when many persons suffering from a chronic disease but did not look physically ill were denied discounts by drugstores and other establishments.

Denver, in fact, said when heard some of his fellow PLHIVs (people living with HIV) tried to inquire and request for necessary papers needed for the PWD ID application, one attending nurse remarked, “hindi naman talaga kayo PWD, mas marami pang ibang nakaadmit dito na mas kailangan ng PWD membership.

In a Nov. 22, 2011 memo to a City Social Welfare Office in Alabang, Social Welfare Undersecretary Alicia R. Bala laid down the policy on 20 percent discount for persons with “chronic illness.”

Bala said, “It should be disability resulting from chronic illness that should be included in the ID.”

“For persons with skin allergy or asthma, although it is under chronic illness yet it is not included as disability whereas for diabetic person, if such illness results to a partial or total blindness, then a person can be considered PWDs because it affects his/her vision,” Bala further said.

Paz, a 40-year-old PWD who’s currently dealing with scoliosis, also expressed her frustration towards the government for not having enough facilities to accommodate them.

“People line up for hours to catch the MRT, taxi stands, and in bus stops, I don’t understand why the government is not doing anything for us,” she complained.

Carmen Reyes Zubiaga, director of the National Council on Disability Affairs

Carmen Reyes Zubiaga, director of the National Council on Disability Affairs

Carmen Reyes Zubiaga, director of the National Council on Disability Affairs, said “the LRT and MRT are implementing a special coach for PWDs, senior citizens, and pregnant women – they have to be in the priority lane. All they have to do is to show their PWD IDs.”

The Accessibility Law or the Batas Pambansa Blg. 344 mandates certain buildings, institutions, establishments, and public utilities to install facilities and other devices that can help accommodate PWDs.

“Although some institutions and establishment have implemented the necessary changes for PWDs, it’s [still] very sad to say that after more than 30 years of being a law, it’s only now that government agencies and even the private entities are really cramming to catch up with the implementation of the Accessibility Law,” Zubiaga said.

Penalty for violation or none implementation of the Accessibility Law provisions includes imprisonment of not less than one month but not more than one year, or a fine of P2,000 to P5,000, or both.

“Even though we have a law that protects us, it’s very vague in terms of penalties and sanctions for those who do not comply. We are now coming up with amendments to it. We are now developing the National Comprehensive Accessibility Law, which does not only cover physical environment, but also information and communication technology that will cater to our blind and deaf members,” Zubiaga said.

Despite the setbacks, Zubiaga is still positive because Filipino PWDs are becoming more aware of their rights and are asserting for their implementation. “We also educate the parents, so they can instill in their children with disabilities that like any other children, they have the same set of rights.”

.

.

(VERA Files is put out by veteran journalists taking a deeper look at current issues. Vera is Latin for “true.”

***

Once there was a proud gay father

leave a comment »

Outrage Magazine | 02 September 2014

***

 

Emerson2

He tried to run away from his real self. He used to spend his days living a kind of life that will satisfy the norms of society. He never thought of himself as a defender of LGBTQIA rights.

But then everything changed.

One day, he met this “beautiful and special woman”. He fell in love with her. And in no time, they got married.

The love they shared brought to the world “three beautiful princesses”. The eldest is already in 3rd year in college, followed by a high school student, and the youngest is a 5th grader.

Emerson3His name is Emerson Soriano. He’s (still) happily married to a heterosexual woman. He is an artist, a defender of human rights, and a proud gay father.

“There came a time na pakiramdam ko nasasakal na ako sa pagiging closeta (I felt stifled hiding in the closet). I was so afraid to come out before,” Emerson recalled.

He used to teach in one of the schools in the Cordillera region. The pressure Emerson felt during that time didn’t help the anxiety he had when he was battling with himself on whether to come out of the closet or continue to pretend and lie about his true gender identity.

But Emerson then took a big risk.

“I came out to my officemates and sinabi ko na (I told them) I’m like this.‘Yung takot noon na kapag nalaman nila kung ano talaga ako, hindi naman talaga ganoon nangyari (The fear I had in the past if they found out my real identity, well, that’s not what transpired). It was a positive response,” he said.

Aside from the feeling of being free, Emerson was also pleased to discover that his friends and community have accepted him for who he really was, and nothing has changed after he came out.

His family, the children in particular, learned about his true sexuality in an unexpected situation.

“During the Pride celebration last year, an AM radio station invited me and another transgender activist to talk on their show. We were asked about the LGBTQIA movement, what it’s like to love a gay person, among other things,” Emerson recalled. Pero ang hindi ko alam, nakikinig rin pala ‘yung family members ko sa radio station nayun (What I didn’t know was my entire family was also listening to that radio station). And they heard the whole interview.”

Emerson paused, took a deep breath, and smiled. Nakaoff ‘yung cellphone ko (My mobile phone was turned off) that time because I was in an interview. When I switched it back on after the program, the messages started coming in. I opened it one by one. I was smiling and teary-eyed at the same time as I read the messages. ‘Yung mga anak ko ‘yung nag-text. Sabi nila, tanggap nila kung ano talaga ako, at mahal na mahal nila ako (My children sent text messages. They said they accept me for who I am, and that they really, really love me).”

Emerson paused for a few seconds again, this time, a bit teary-eyed. “They accepted me for who I really am. And said that they love me,” he repeated.

Lahat ng ginagawa ko at mga pinaghihirapan ko, para lahatyun sa mga mga anak ko (Everything that I do and work hard for, it’s all for my children),” Emerson added.

Since then, a lot of things have changed.

He is now more active in various LGBTQIA events. The wariness he felt before, every time he speaks in front of the crowd, is no longer there.

“Ever since I came out, I feel so much free. Kahit sa Facebook, ‘yung mga friends ng mga anak ko (Even on Facebook, the friends of my children)they are all friendly. They don’t find being gay negative, they don’t have the concept that being gay is negative, that it is only limited to cross-dressing. They tell me that I am a positive influence to them, because I did what is right,” Emerson added.

Aside from being a human rights activist, Emerson spends his spare time making artworks and exhibiting them.

“My job, being an activist, medyo palaging nagkukulang ako pagdating sa (often, I run out of) allowance. My skill in the arts has helped me gain extra income,” he said.

Emerson is currently commissioned by the Ecological Sanctuary of Baguio to design the walls of “Earth House”, a structure completely made of clay and stones.

He is able to express his emotions through his artworks. “Sometimes, yung depression na nararamdaman ko (the depression I feel), you will see them in my works. It’s a great avenue for me to express what I really feel.”

Emerson’s message to those who are not yet out?

“Kung gaano niyo kamahal ang inyong pamilya, ganoon din ang ibabalik sa inyo. Kung gaano niyo sila nirerespeto, ganoon din ang ibabalik sa inyo. My advice is, pakiramdaman niyo muna ang kapaligiran niyo, malalaman niyo naman kung tama na ang panahon. Kasi mahirap pilitin ang isang environment na tanggapin ang isang bagay na hindi nila nakasanayan (The love you give your family, that’s the love they will give to you. The respect you give them, is the respect they will give to you. My advice is, get a sense if it’s the right time to come out. Because it’s hard to forcefully come out in an environment that is not yet ready).”

.

.

(Outrage Magazine remains the only publication for the lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) community in the Philippines.)

***

RITM: PLHIVs may not receive ARVs next week

leave a comment »

Outrage Magazine | 03 September 2014

***

 

ARV

Time to panic?

Dr. Rosanna Ditangco, research chief at the Research Institute for Tropical Medicine-AIDS Research Group (RITM-ARG, one of the treatment hubs in the country), highlighted the dire situation faced by Filipino people living with HIV (PLHIV) after she reportedly said that the distribution of antiretroviral medicines (ARVs) may be stopped due to processing delays.

In a letter sent to the Department of Health (DOH) Secretary, Dr. Enrique Ona, dated September 2, HIV activist Pozzie Pinoy of the Red Ribbon Project, quoted Ditangco for saying that if the ARVs that are currently being held by the Bureau of Customs (BOC) will not be released by Friday, September 5, then “HIV treatment will totally stop all over the country.”

The Project Red Ribbon claimed receiving insider information that “BOC is requiring DOH to pay P5 million for the tax of the shipment (i.e. ARVs)”, and that “the said shipment has been in the storage of BOC since August of this year.”

DIRE SITUATION 

The number of HIV and AIDS cases in the Philippines already reached 19,915 as of July 2014, the National Epidemiology Center of the Department of Health (DOH) reported. And from January to July this year alone, the number of Filipinos living with HIV who are on antiretroviral therapy (ART) reached 7,172.

Obviously, the numbers are expected to rise, considering the continuing growing number of new cases reported by the DOH.

ON DEAF EARS

This issue was actually raised as early as February of this year, when PLHIVs started receiving limited supplies of ARVs from their treatment hubs. In a blog post by Pozzie Pinoy, Ditangco was quoted as saying that most Philippine HIV treatment hubs give out supplies for only either two weeks or one month, because of the delay in the delivery of meds to DOH.

After two weeks, Ditangco reported that the DOH will already deliver the ARV supplies to the respective treatment hubs.

Interestingly, according to Dr. Jose Gerard Belimac, head of DOH’s National AIDS/STI Prevention and Control Program, there is no delay in the procurement of ARVs, just as there is no “official pronouncement from the DOH to the treatment hubs to control [the distribution of ARVs] because of a delay in the procurement [of ARVs],” he said in an exclusive interview by Outrage Magazine.

Belimac also assured that “this is something we are trying to resolve, to ensure the continuity of treatment for PLHIV.”

What is not discussed is the delivery of ARVs differ from what PLHIVs use, with changes made to regimens of PLHIVs without medically sound reasons.  As a PLHIV whose medicines were changed last March stated, “the ARVs given [to] me were changed because there’s no stock of my usual ARVs. [The doctor said], no choice.”

ABNORMAL SITUATION?

Despite all these pronouncements about the availability of supplies, the fluctuating supply of ARVs continued in the next months. Different PLHIVs from different treatment hubs complained about the insufficient (from two weeks’ to one month’s supply, depending on the hub), ARVs given to them every time they get a refill.

Ditangco, in an interview by Outrage Magazine last April, said that “ang ARV supplies natin ay wala naman talagang problema. Nagkaroon lang tayo ng abnormal situation becausenagkaroon ng miscalculations in ordering (our ARV supplies do not have problems. We’re just having an abnormal situation because of miscalculations in ordering). There’s no need to cause unnecessary panic among PLHIVs.”

But panic is what is happening now.

During those months of notable ARV shortage, Project Red Ribbon actually purchased four boxes of Lamivudine and Tenofovir, a two-in-one mix of the two drugs.

“If there is no problem, why is it that we are buying from other countries to supplement the problems with the stocks? And we were able to release it from the (BOC) in just one week, as opposed to what other people are saying that it’s hard to release it from Customs. The PLHIV community is panicking for the past months now. The DOH has not been transparent with its programs when it comes to ARV medicines,” Pozzie Pinoy stressed.

Also, even as the DOH continues to deny that there is a problem with the supply of ARVs in the Philippines, one by one, treatment hubs started borrowing ARV supplies from other hubs that have “enough supply”.

Ditangco was in fact quoted by Pozzie Pinoy as saying that RITM-ARG, in the last two weeks, has been lending their ARV stocks to other HIV and AIDS treatment hubs in Metro Manila and in the provinces because of the shortage.

DELAY = DEATH

Last August 26, different LGBTQIA organizations from all over the Philippines – including Ladlad Caraga Inc., The AIDS Treatment Action Group Philippines (TATAG), REDx, Northern Mindanao Advocates, and The Well Philippines – wrote a letter to the BOC for it to provide a clearer picture on the following issues:

  1. What and how much were the duties and taxes imposed for the particular shipment?
  2. What is the basis of computation for duties and taxes levied against the imported ARVs?
  3. What is the cause of delay for the release of life saving ARVs to DOH?
  4. Is the agency taking any steps to expedite the release of ARVs to DOH?

To date, no response has been received, no matter the urgency of the issue.

Pozzie Pinoy is appealing to the DOH and the BOC to do something about this life and death situation.

“I am pleading and begging you, on behalf of the entire PLHIV community and the entire country, to please look into this matter immediately and find a quick solution to this problem. What we can do now is to call for the attention of your department, and of the BOC to take action before this gets out of hand,” he stated.

Outrage Magazine is one with the PLHIV community in demanding that the Department of Health should look into this matter as soon as possible and address this issue immediately. 

.

.

(Outrage Magazine remains the only publication for the lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) community in the Philippines.)

***

‘Out and Proud’ documentary to examine LGBTQI issues

leave a comment »

Outrage Magazine | 19 June 2014

***

 

Aside from highlighting the plight of LGBTQI Filipinos, the special will also feature the stories of “Out!” hosts JM Cobarrubias, Avi Siwa, and Jigs Mayuga.

Aside from highlighting the plight of LGBTQI Filipinos, the special will also feature the stories of “Out!” hosts JM Cobarrubias, Avi Siwa, and Jigs Mayuga.

In 2004, when GMA-7 launched the magazine TV show “Out!”, it was – in a way – groundbreaking.  The show narrated the stories of LGBTQI people in the Philippines; featured the lifestyle of people in the community; highlighted the successes of members of the community; and documented the endeavors that LGBTQI people face, whether coming out to the family or facing social disapproval.

As such, as many may claim now, “Out!” was ahead of its time as the first and only locally produced LGBTQI-themed magazine show that aired on free TV. During its short run, LGBTQI people were given a face somehow.

Out-and-Proud2As the community celebrates Pride Month this June, GMA-7, in its effort to show its support to the LGBTQI community, will be airing a documentary called “Out and Proud”.  The hour long special will attempt to answer the issues the LGBTQI people continue to face.

“’Out and Proud’ is GMA’s offering this Pride month; this is (to show) how GMA appreciates the LGBTQI community. It will feature LGBTQI people who conquered stereotypes, couples who have fought for their love, and many other stories,” JM Cobarrubias, program manager of “Out and Proud”, said to Outrage Magazine.

The documentary is also a tribute to “Out!”, a celebration of its triumphs 10 years ago.

“We want to honor ‘Out!’, a milestone GMA has achieved. So many things have happened since then, and we would like to review the milestones and breakthroughs the LGBTQI people achieved over the years,” Cobarrubias said.

The special will feature the stories of “Out!” hosts JM Cobarrubias, Avi Siwa, and Jigs Mayuga; TransMan Pilipinas’ Nil Nodalo; Internet celebrity Sebastian Castro; couple Aiza Seguerra and Liza Dino; married gay partners director Jun Lana and Perci Intalan; “My Husband’s Lover” lead actors Tom Rodriguez and Dennis Trillo; and others.

And through the interviewees narratives, the show will attempt to answer the following: Is the society now more accepting of LGBTQI people compared to how it’s been 10 years ago? Is the Philippines really the “most gay-friendly country in Asia”? Are the efforts of the government enough to address the needs and welfare of the LGBTQs?

“We are a gay-friendly country, with so many inspiring LGBTs, and this, among other things, is the reason why LGBTQI people should celebrate Pride Month. So let’s be out and proud!” Cobarrubias said.

Out and Proud” will air on June 22 (Sunday) in GMA-7 at 10:40 PM.

.

.

(Outrage Magazine remains the only publication for the lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) community in the Philippines.)

***

BoyCircuit International gives back to PHL LGBT community

leave a comment »

Outrage Magazine | 22 February 2014

***

BoyCircuit logoProject Red Ribbon logo

Hong Kong-based BoyCircuit International, which specializes in hosting events for LGBT people across Asia-Pacific, has officially announced the recipient of the BlueBall 2014 endowment. BoyCircuit, which initially had a short list of potential organizations to partner with, chose Project Red Ribbon.

Project Red Ribbon started as a blog in 2011, providing information to PLHIV particularly in the Philippines.  It has served as a go-to of some sort for many, responding to questions and inquiries from its readers with the help of Dr. Rosanna Ditangco, who helms Research Institute for Tropical Medicine-AIDS Research Group (RITM-ARG).

Project Red Ribbon was established by blogger Pozzie Pinoy.

Project Red Ribbon is different from other organizations that cater to PLHIV, (since) 99% of our managers are PLHIVs, so we really understand what they’re going through,” Pozzie Pinoy said.

Every month, Project Red Ribbon assists from 200 to 300 people, positive or not, including in such needs as: HIV testing, HIV treatment hubs assistance, one-on-one and group counseling, giving of inspirational talks, hospital visitation, and health and fitness gatherings, among others.

After BlueBall 2014, Project Red Ribbon will receive a grant from BoyCircuit to further their efforts to benefit PLHIVs.

“A portion of the profits from BlueBall will be donated back to the Project Red Ribbon. We selected them because we saw how they work for the PLHIV community. They dedicate most of their time to educate, to do outreach programs and help PLHIV in their treatments,” Kenny Martinez, president of BoyCircuit International, said.

For Pozzie Pinoythe help they will be receiving from BoyCircuit will greatly affect how they do their community work.  “There were times when we have to say no or not say a word at all when there are financial constraints to treatments, and it breaks our hearts to see this limitation. But, now that we are expecting extra funding, not only we will be able to help more, but we can also continue providing more projects and services for our fellow PLHIVs.”

According to Pozzie Pinoya huge portion of the endowment will go to The Love Fund, a project specifically geared towards helping the indigent and less fortunate PLHIVs.

“Many indigent PLHIV need medical assistance for expensive laboratory tests for HIV, and some of which are not covered by the PhilHealth. Some of the indigent individuals that we assist don’t even have money for transportation and food once they get confined,” Pozzie Pinoy added.

“We plan to establish close relationships with local LGBT communities, HIV/AIDS research and outreach organizations,” Martinez said, “BoyCircuit is not just a party organizer, we can also be seen as a vehicle to empower organizations who deserve to be empowered.”

He also said that The Love Fund is also used by its members when they deliver antiretroviral medicines (ARV)s to PLHIVs living in the provinces.

Dubbed as “the dance party you have always imagined and will never forget,” BoyCircuit International is slated to host BlueBall 2014 on the 28th of February.

“Any community where BoyCircuit works, we make sure that we give something back to them,” Martinez said, adding that as BoyCircuit prepares for their next endeavor, “it’s not just about the parties, it’s not just about having good music where you can dance with to forget all your problems. It’s also about finding ways on how each of us can give something in return to our community.”

Martinez added: “I wouldn’t classify myself as an advocate, but that doesn’t mean I don’t care about the people around me. I really want to help the PLHIV community. I have a soft spot for them because my grandfather died of AIDS in 1984.”

And with BoyCircuit’s dedication to giving back to the PLHIV community, dancing to good music while sipping cocktails will hopefully never be the same again after BlueBall.

Outrage Magazine is the official media partner of BlueBall 2014.

BlueBall 2014 tickets are on sale now at SM ticket outlets and BED Manila. For further information about BoyCircuit and BlueBall, visit http://boycircuit.com.

.

.

(Outrage Magazine remains the only publication for the lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) community in the Philippines.)

***

%d bloggers like this: